Youth Candidate to UN Secretary-General

article 1 UNSG youth candidateThe UNYANET team has been following the debates of UN Secretary-General candidates. We find them very interesting but somehow they tend to forget about youth issues despite the fact that young people account for more than half of the world’s population. Thus, we strongly believe that youth issues should be addressed by the next UNSG. That’s why we launch this campaign to propose a young candidate for UNSG to raise awareness about youth and Sustainable Development Goals.


Are you a young person passionate about international relations, dreaming to make a better world and willing to contribute to raise global awareness about youth issues and SDGs? This is for you! All young people who have the interest to run for UN Secretary-General, please, start the application process here:


The application will further require:

  1. CV
  2. motivation letter with picture of the candidate (400 words maximum)
  3. vision statement including challenges of the UN, solutions, linkages between Sustainable Development Goals and youth, and why we need a young candidate for UN-Secretary General (maximum 6000 words)

Vision statements as well as selected articles by youth candidates  discussing youth and SDGs will be published in the blog.

Selection process will followed by an interview. Selected candidates will be asked to write a vision statement on youth and Sustainable Development Goals. Applications close on 20th August 2016 12am GMT. Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.


Looking forward to meet the future candidates.


A short description of our project:

After discussing the main challenges of global governance during the UNYANET General Assembly in September 2015, the proposal for a young candidate to run for UNSG was emerged to give a younger energy, more vibrant voice and renewed image of the United Nations.

The “Youth to UN-Secretary General Online Campaign” is run by student leaders, most of whom are from the universities located in the 18 countries where UNYANET is present.


Mission Statement:

We believe by promoting a younger candidate to run for UN Secretary-General (UNSG) will incorporate the demands of the youth and seek for possible solutions.

  1. To empower youth with knowledge and skills for UN work contribution
  2. To create awareness and inform about the current state of the world is a top priority for youth to solve the issues behind global governance

Selection Criteria:

  1. The priorities of the youth candidate are thoroughly selected after examining the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), World Programme of Action for Youth (WPAY), My World 2015 survey and the Global Governance and Youth Workshop organized by the UN Youth Network.
  2. Such online participatory selection process of youth candidates will be followed by an online public debate which organise between different candidates to UNSG and some representatives of the 15 Member States that will vote.

Target Audience:

  1. Youth
  2. Students
  3. Academics
  4. Relevant public figures
  5. Other candidates to UNSG, to all UN Member States especially to the 15 of the UN Security Council and other interested parties


Online promotion of the SDGs, the results of MyWorld2015 and other youth priorities

Useful link:

UN Non-Governmental Liaison Service, “In 2016, the UN will appoint a new Secretary-General” ask the


UNYANET does not charge any fees in the application process. UNYANET has no liability for any consequences of the campaign.

Nationality: Global Citizen

Source: GlobalGiving

Source: GlobalGiving

No matter what global problem you are dreading, whether it’s the elimination of poverty, whether it’s the creation of peace, whether its solving environmental energy problems, the solution- whatever it is- multiple solutions, the solutions always include education, never is it without an education component and sometimes cannot be done without education.

– Nicholas Negroponte

Growing up, my parents constantly affirmed, “Education is the passport to the world of opportunities.” I believed them, and I still do. As a teacher today, I tell my students the same thing.

In a privileged country like Singapore, education is a determined right of all citizens. The moment we step into Primary One, an EduSave account is set up in the student’s name by the government. Every year thereafter until the students reaches the age of sixteen, SGD 200 is credited into the account annually. The fund can be used by the student to pay for tuition fees and any other government-approved co-curricular activities and school trips. As of 2015, according to Organisation of Economic Co-Operation and Development, Singapore tops the global school ranking.

This is all well and good for the small city-state. My bigger concern today is, how do we get this world-recognised education to every student on the planet, especially when we constantly demand that education is a basic human right. How is it possible that in today’s globalised and technologically advanced world, that the right to education is based on a handful of pre-determined factors? Factors that include; where the child was born, their ethnic affiliations and even what their last name is.

Currently, more than 124 million children and adolescents are out of school. UNESCO predicts that this number is on the rise. This is a clear indication that the system we have in place, is not working and must be changed.

It is time to rethink the system because obviously, the global education system we have set for ourselves no longer serves today’s world. If we continue to demand from governments whose priority is not their citizen’s education, then, we must acknowledge that a clear violation of a right has occurred and must be amended.

It is time to hand out those passports in order that all children, regardless of their race, nationality, place of birth, or social creed, get access to a basic primary education. We, as the youths and adults, have the obligation to at least do one thing right – to provide our children, the future of the world, with opportunities to make this planet a better place.

Project Inspire 2015: Progress for Women is Progress for All

Project Inspire 2015

Project Inspire 2015

“A new economic agenda will not only make the economy work for women, but also benefit the majority of men. Progress for women is progress for all.”

– UN Women Flagship Report “Progress of the World’s Women 2015-2016”

As the international community is poised to agree on the new set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), there is a strong and growing global consensus on the need to achieve gender equality. While we have to acknowledge the significant strides made towards this goal, we have to also focus on where we need to redouble our efforts to achieve substantive equality and the realization of human rights for all women and girls.

To educate girls is to reduce poverty.

Now in its fifth edition, Project Inspire: 5 Minutes to Change the World seeks to highlight the efforts of entrepreneurial women in the less advantaged global regions and celebrates five years of supporting social entrepreneurs around the world. This is done in the hopes of emphasizing the right of all women and girls to a good job with equal pay and safe working conditions, which in the medium to long run should be brought into consideration during economic policymaking. Through Project Inspire, we hope that the increased support would enable these women to provide enough income to support a decent, sustainable standard of living for themselves and their families.

Little girls with dreams become women with vision.

Little girls with dreams become women with vision.

Previous notable projects have been those such as the 2014 Runner-up, Riverkids Project, which provides counselling, healthcare and vocational training for Cambodian sex workers, so they can transition out of the sex industry, and run their own small business; and the 2014 People’s Choice, Sinag Store Project, where financially disadvantaged girl students will gain marketable design skills and experience first-hand how to use those skills to launch a social enterprise project.

Launched in 2011 to celebrate the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day and the 25th anniversary of MasterCard in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa, “Project Inspire: 5 minutes to Change the World” is a global challenge that presents 18-35 year olds with a 5-minute platform to pitch their inspired idea to the world.

The fastest way to change society is to mobilise women of the world.

The fastest way to change society is to mobilise women of the world.

With a US$25,000 Grand Prize and US$10,000 Runner-Up Prize on offer to make their idea a reality, Project Inspire 2015 will take on the theme of ‘Technology or Design for Economic Empowerment’. Applicants will be asked to demonstrate how they use design or technology as a tool in the work they are doing to enable and empower women economically throughout Asia, the Pacific, Middle East & Africa.

As part of the youth community, let us take a stand and continue to support these youth initiatives and the projects and women that they support during the crowdfunding period. The Grand Finals will be held in Singapore on November 13, 2015. For more information, please go to

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The Mediterranean island of Cyprus has experienced during its history complex episodes of hostilities that have led to the division of the territory, which determines the current state of the conflict between the two opposing factions. But before analysing the latest disputes, let’s take a brief look back at Cyprus’ history to better understand the background of the conflict. Continue reading

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UNYANET x World Press Freedom Day 2015: In memory of those who lost their lives

world_press_freedom_day__pedro_x__molinaFreedom of speech is a fundamental human right – and paramount to any democracy. For centuries people have died for the right to speak their minds. Today, those who enjoy it tend to forget their freedom is by no means self-evident. Why people – despite history – still have to fight for it. Continue reading