Achieving Universal Primary Education

Source: World Bank

Source: World Bank

Among the eight MDG goals, achieving universal primary education is second of them. Many children of the developing and under-developed countries are deprived of this basic need. There are many reasons behind, why the primary education should be compulsory for all. Just think about a situation, a young girl or boy, who has completed her primary education may be careful about the important things like as marrying at a later age, having fewer children, decreasing the chance of HIV, finding employment, seeking medical care, doing noble for the community etc.

The target of this goal is: “Ensure that, by 2015, children everywhere, boys and girls alike, will be able to complete a full course of primary schooling” Now let’s see where we stand so far:

  • The total number of non-school going children declines to 100 million to 58 million worldwide between 2000 to 2012.
  • The rate of completion of primary education is increased to 81% to 90% in last 12 years.
  • Literacy rate and gender gaps among adults and youths are narrowing in the developing and underdeveloped countries.
  • In comparison between 2007 to 2012, around 2 million decline in the number of out of school children.
  • In 2012, the ratio between enrolment rate of girls, than that of boys in 100% for all developing regions.

We have found that many non-profit organizations are still working on it to achieve this MDG. The name of some organization is Global Campaign for Education, UNICEF, Oxfam International, Save the Children, Peace Corps, UNESCO, World Bank, Child Aid, World Food Program, Food and Agricultural Organization of United Nations, Global Alliance for Improve Nutrition etc. They have already taken many projects and got positive impacts like as about 2.7 million girls were enrolled in primary education in 2012 in Afghanistan, ‘second chance’ primary education was provided more than 0.79 million out of school children in Bangladesh and so on.

Universal Primary education achievement rate, Source: UNDP

Universal Primary education achievement rate, Source: UNDP

It is time I focused the different steps which are taken by organizations to achieve universal primary education. Now come for World Bank (WB). With the help of IDA, WB has trained more than 3.5 million teachers from 2002 to 2012, renovated 2 million classrooms for 105 million children and gave around 300 million textbooks for free. Along with WB, other non-profit organizations have taken many projects to ensure universal primary education. A book named “Achieving Universal Primary Education by 2015: Volume 1” by Barbara Bruns, Ramahatra Rakotomalala shows that it may be difficult for the organizations to achieve this MDG in 2015, if they do not change their current trends and here is the graph:

required trend achievement

Current trends v/s required trends of this MDG
Source: “Achieving Universal Primary Education by 2015: Volume 1” by Barbara Bruns, Ramahatra Rakotomalala

The organizations, who are working for achieving this MDG, may face several problems in reality. Here are some recommendations for achieving removing the hindrances:
o Giving more effective training to the teachers of the primary school
o Making educational materials free for all the students of primary school
o Motivating both the students and the guardians in the form of giving primary school scholarships for regular school going students
o For ensuring nutrition as well as giving motivation, free tiffin should be provided to the students
o Ensuring that education leads to learning skill which is relevant and good quality
o Changing the people’s mentality and erasing child labor

Among five basic needs, education is one of them. The day is not far when all young boys and girls of the world have the access of primary education as well as improves the living standards.


MDGs blog series

This article is part of the UNYANET Millennium Development Goals blog series.

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Paul Bikash Chandra

Bikash Chandra Paul, born in 1994 in Bangladesh, is currently an undergraduate student of Faculty of Business Studies, University of Dhaka which is one of the best business schools in Asia. His concentration is on Accounting and Information Systems. He passed his college from Notre Dame College. His dream is to contribute in the economic sector and business sector as well. He loves to play cricket, football and to try new foods. He has also a deep interest about alien and cosmology.
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About Paul Bikash Chandra

Bikash Chandra Paul, born in 1994 in Bangladesh, is currently an undergraduate student of Faculty of Business Studies, University of Dhaka which is one of the best business schools in Asia. His concentration is on Accounting and Information Systems. He passed his college from Notre Dame College. His dream is to contribute in the economic sector and business sector as well. He loves to play cricket, football and to try new foods. He has also a deep interest about alien and cosmology.

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