Youth Candidate to UN Secretary-General

article 1 UNSG youth candidateThe UNYANET team has been following the debates of UN Secretary-General candidates. We find them very interesting but somehow they tend to forget about youth issues despite the fact that young people account for more than half of the world’s population. Thus, we strongly believe that youth issues should be addressed by the next UNSG. That’s why we launch this campaign to propose a young candidate for UNSG to raise awareness about youth and Sustainable Development Goals.

 

Are you a young person passionate about international relations, dreaming to make a better world and willing to contribute to raise global awareness about youth issues and SDGs? This is for you! All young people who have the interest to run for UN Secretary-General, please, start the application process here: http://goo.gl/forms/HGUVFzYTXbRQQdzO2

 

The application will further require:

  1. CV
  2. motivation letter with picture of the candidate (400 words maximum)
  3. vision statement including challenges of the UN, solutions, linkages between Sustainable Development Goals and youth, and why we need a young candidate for UN-Secretary General (maximum 6000 words)

Vision statements as well as selected articles by youth candidates  discussing youth and SDGs will be published in the blog.

Selection process will followed by an interview. Selected candidates will be asked to write a vision statement on youth and Sustainable Development Goals. Applications close on 20th August 2016 12am GMT. Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

 

Looking forward to meet the future candidates.

 

A short description of our project:

After discussing the main challenges of global governance during the UNYANET General Assembly in September 2015, the proposal for a young candidate to run for UNSG was emerged to give a younger energy, more vibrant voice and renewed image of the United Nations.

The “Youth to UN-Secretary General Online Campaign” is run by student leaders, most of whom are from the universities located in the 18 countries where UNYANET is present.

 

Mission Statement:

We believe by promoting a younger candidate to run for UN Secretary-General (UNSG) will incorporate the demands of the youth and seek for possible solutions.
Objectives:

  1. To empower youth with knowledge and skills for UN work contribution
  2. To create awareness and inform about the current state of the world is a top priority for youth to solve the issues behind global governance

Selection Criteria:

  1. The priorities of the youth candidate are thoroughly selected after examining the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), World Programme of Action for Youth (WPAY), My World 2015 survey and the Global Governance and Youth Workshop organized by the UN Youth Network.
  2. Such online participatory selection process of youth candidates will be followed by an online public debate which organise between different candidates to UNSG and some representatives of the 15 Member States that will vote.

Target Audience:

  1. Youth
  2. Students
  3. Academics
  4. Relevant public figures
  5. Other candidates to UNSG, to all UN Member States especially to the 15 of the UN Security Council and other interested parties

Activities:

Online promotion of the SDGs, the results of MyWorld2015 and other youth priorities

Useful link:

UN Non-Governmental Liaison Service, “In 2016, the UN will appoint a new Secretary-General” ask the http://www.unngls.world/home

 

UNYANET does not charge any fees in the application process. UNYANET has no liability for any consequences of the campaign.

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