#7 Ensuring access to energy for all

Goal-7

2014 marks the launch of the United Nations decade of Sustainable Energy for All, which calls for universal access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all. Energy access is a vital development goal, and the focus on energy as part of the agenda reflects energy as crucial in solving many development challenges.

The importance of universal access to modern energy services may not be clearly obvious, but its impact on developing countries are wide and far reaching, being critical to a country’s socioeconomic development. Increased access to reliable clean energy is essential for the protection of ecosystems through basic human rights such as sanitation and healthcare, as well as strengthening economies through improving access to education and improving national infrastructure. Continue reading

Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women

Source: UN Women

Source: UN Women

Women constitute a central focus in the socio-culture system of every nation. Many world bodies, international, non-government organizations have also established legal, administrative and institutional structure for the effective existence and survival of women and girls.

In 1995, the Beijing platform for action remains a relevant guideline for development programming. It provide for “an agenda for women’s empowerment” signed by all government that is seen as “a necessary and fundamental pre-requisite for equality, development and peace.

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Race, Class, Imperialism, Mankind and the Young – Ingxubevange

ujdaklsgdönnamed

I have been reading Steve Biko’s “I Write What I like” and in it he opens up my eyes and names things I have been thinking about but have failed to give names to. Biko tackles lots of issues from colonialism to racism and imperialism. Biko confronts the issue of white guilt stemming from the past and how white South Africans, particularly, deal with this guilt. “Basically the South African white community are a homogeneous group of people. It is a community of people who sit to enjoy a privileged position they do not deserve, are aware of this, and therefore try to spend time trying to justify what they do and why they are doing so. Where differences in political opinion exist, they are in the process of trying to justify their position and usurpation of power” Steve Biko. Biko further suggests that white South Africans become liberal in hope to overcome their guilt, and not because they understand what black South Africans have been through, are going through and will continue to endure. Whilst Biko wrote the article during the epitome of Apartheid, his Black Consciousness (BC) ideals still prove to be necessary. It is however imperative that black people do not use BC ideals to perpetuate racism, for populist tactics that are likely to degenerate their countries into states of anarchy that undermine the democracies that were attained through blood, sweat and sacrifices.

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Domestic Workers or Slaves? A Question for Kenya

imageThe word “domestic” can contain many different meanings to those who interpret it. Some may think of it as a positive word, one that denotes the respectable position of keeping a home well-kept and presentable, while others may think of it as a negative word, which implies the daily drudgery of household tasks that keep the performers of these tasks in a never-ending routine of work. Whatever “domestic” may mean to people, it more than often has a feminine connotation. “A woman’s place is in the home” is a colloquial saying that was hegemonic in the collective consciousness of American society in the past and still persists in the present times. But what is the nature of domestic work? What happens to domestic work and the people who perform it when it is converted from a kind of work that is not measured by monetary earnings and completed by the women who live in the private sphere of the home, to a service which is completed by a hired and paid worker?

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My Road to Success as a Volunteer

Seleman1

Mr. Seleman at UNESCO`s HQ in Paris when he attend 8th UNESCO
Youth forum in 2013

We can create the world we dream of”. My name is Seleman Yusuph Kitenge. I`m a Tanzanian young leader aged 25 years old. I`m  the seventh born in the family of eight children. I finished primary education in 2004 and joined Azania Secondary school where I graduated in 2008. In 2009 I commenced my college education at Tanzania Public Service College and graduated with a Diploma in Public Sector Financial management. Currently, I`m a third year student at the Open University of Tanzania, pursuing a Bachelor degree of Arts in Sociology. I`m a Native Swahili speaker, fluent in English and a basic German speaker, I`m passionate about sustainable development, humanitarian work, media and communication, international relations, photographing, social activism and peace advocacy. I have previously volunteered as a Peer Educator for Don Bosco Life Choices Program, Azania Roots and shoots club as a Coordinator, Chairman and Founder of Tanzania Public Service College United Nations chapter and served as a Consultant to President of Tanzania Public Service college student organization.

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The Status of Refugees in Kenya

UNHCR E Hockstein Kenya1

Source: UNHCR in Kenya / E. Hockstein

A refugee is defined as a person who has fled his or her own country to seek refuge in another country for the safety of his/her life and limb because of a well-founded fear of persecution. The definition of a refugee also covers those who are compelled to leave their domicile or place of habitual residence because of among other things, ‘events seriously disturbing public order in his or her country of origin’. The main sources of International Law on refugees are the 1951 Refugee Convention, and the OAU Convention of 1969. Kenya acceded to the 1951 Convention but has not ratified it (according to the UNHCR website in 2014). The obligations under these documents include not sending a person back to a country where he or she may be persecuted, and in the case of the OAU convention where his or her life is threatened because of the threats to public order which form the basis for refugee status; not discriminating among groups of refugees; the right of refugees to freedom of movement and to work in the country (though a three year limit on the right to work can be imposed to protect the local labour market); the same right to basic education as a national; the duty of refugees to obey the law in the country where they are received. The OAU Convention adds that members states shall ‘use their best endeavours’ to receive refugees and ensure their settlement. Continue reading

The Role of Renewable Energies in Achieving Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in Ghana. (Solar Energy)

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are eight goals with measurable targets and clear deadlines for improving the lives of the world’s deprived people. To meet these goals and eradicate poverty, leaders of 189 countries signed the historic millennium declaration at the United Nations Millennium Summit in the year 2000. However, renewable energy is reliable, abundant and will potentially be very cheap once technology and infrastructure are improved. It includes solar, wind, geothermal, hydropower and tidal energy, plus biofuels that are grown and harvested without fossil fuels. Non-renewable energy, such as coal and petroleum, require costly explorations and potentially dangerous mining and drilling, and they will become more expensive as supplies decrease and demand increases.

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The Social Corporate Responsibility of International Oil Companies in Nigeria and the Global Compact of the UN

Nigeria’s economy is highly dependent on oil found in the Niger delta area of the country.

Photo: Daily Telegraph

Photo: Daily Telegraph

The social corporate responsibility of international oil companies faces a different political and economic environment both nationally and at the level of producing communities where there facilities are located.  The NNPC (Nigeria National Petroleum Corporation) operates mainly through joint venture contract. The greatest joint partners of NNPC remains. The Anglo Dutch conglomerate, Chevron, Texaco and Nigeria liquefied Natural Gas ( a subsidiary of NNPC). Unfortunately, the influx of oil companies and the heightening of their operations in Niger Delta are not matched with an agenda for the development of Nigeria in general and Niger Delta in particular. The oil companies claim to have executed several projects in the host communities as part of their corporate social responsibility. The claims include: the construction of hospitals, roads and schools, provision of potable water, electricity and programmes among others. However, the host communities in Niger Delta seem not to have acknowledged these acclaimed community development projects by the oil companies as they continue in their hostile disposition to the companies. The relationship of cordiality which existed between oil communities and oil companies in the good days have given away hostility and violence thereby causing the form of pipelines vandalism, kidnapping, shutting down of oil companies and seizure of oil installation. Continue reading