Goal 12: Sustainable consumption and production – UN calling and our answer

Goal-12By Rima-Maria Rahal

Statements which describe the importance of achieving sustainable consumption and production begin by highlighting that there is a necessity backed by hard facts to embrace this goal: the human population is growing rapidly, being projected to reach 9.5 billion by 2050 – and it needs to be fed. This goal of eradicating hunger has not been achieved even with the comparatively few 7 billion heads we number currently. At the same time we are overexploiting and destroying the majority of ecosystems that we rely today already, painting an even dimmer picture of our prospects of feeding the planet’s growing number of inhabitants. Usually, this is where the executive summaries, issues briefs and extended abstracts stop illuminating the relevance of coming up with sustainable consumption and production patterns. Continue reading

#6 Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

Goal-6Human demands on the world’s available water supplies continue to grow due to rapid population growth, urbanization and industrialization. In the endeavour to manage water to meet human needs, greater demand for increasing smaller supply of water resources in the country and the ecological consequences have been tragic. If we hope to sustain water biodiversity, the appropriation of water flows must be better managed in order to ensure a wealth of goods and services for society in healthy water ecosystems.

To protect the ecological integrity of affected ecosystems, ecologically sustainable water management must occur in order to meet intergenerational human needs. Ecological integrity is protected when the compositional and structural diversity and natural functioning of affected ecosystems is maintained.

Continue reading

#5 Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

Goal-5Gender equality is the concept in which men and women deserve the same rights and opportunities. Since the beginning of the 21st century, the United Nations has regarded the importance of this human right by making it a central goal of the UN’s eight Millennium Development Goals. These objectives serve as a framework for eradicating poverty and encouraging global development. The gender equality goal aimed to “promote gender equality and empower women”; more specifically, it expected to “eliminate gender disparities in primary education and secondary education, preferably by 2000, and in all levels of education, no latter than 2015.” Fifteen years later, the UN has concluded in its final MDG report that even though gender gaps in access to education have narrowed, uneven progress has been made toward achieving the target at its core. As a result, many disparities remain in all levels of education: secondary and university education levels remain highly unequal and in many parts of the world women continue to face all kinds of discrimination in access to education, work, economic assets or participation in government.

Continue reading

#4 Ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education and promote life-long learning opportunities for all

Goal-4Education is the fundamental principle that enables citizens to develop their own perspective of the world. As Malala Yousazfai said at the United Nations, “one child, one teacher, one book and one pen can change the world”. Education gifts people with a voice, it allows understanding of your rights and duties, and it provides a person with the knowledge to lead a healthy and fulfilling life. However, despite the importance of receiving an education, in 2012, 58 million children were still out of school. Moreover, there are huge gender gaps in youth literacy rates. According to the United Nations 60 per cent of the adults and youth who lack basic reading and writing skills are women. It is crucial to think over this data and to take measures in this regard.

Continue reading